Songs about Sweden 1: ‘Gothenburg’

There have been many songs written about Sweden and Swedish towns. In this series, I will share a few with you.

First out is the song ‘Gothenburg’ by Maia Hirasawa. This 2007 single is from her debut album ‘Though I’m just me’ and is a tribute to Sweden’s second city.

Maia Hirasawa went on to become a prize-winning artist with several albums to her name. She tours regularly, and in October will be on tour in Japan, her father’s homeland.

Ten Hollywood Film Stars of Swedish Descent

During the mid to late 1800’s, a staggering 1.2 million Swedes emigrated to the USA for a better life. Based on the 1950’s novel series by Vilhelm Moberg, the 2021 film ‘The Emigrants’ depicts this period.

It is hardly surprising then that Swedish DNA is mixed into the diverse genetic melting pot in America.

With this in mind, there are many stars who are proud of their Swedish heritage. Some, you could guess their ancestry by their names. Others not so much. But all of them certainly inherited the beautiful Swedish gene. Here are ten of them:

Julia Roberts – het great grandmother was born in the county of Värmland

Matt Damon – his grandmother was Swedish

Kirsten Dunst – has several generations of Swedes on her mother’s side

James Franco – has Swedish roots on his father’s side

Jake Gyllenhaal – his great grandfather was Swedish. He is also a part of a Swedish noble family.

Emma Stone – had a Swedish grandfather

Michelle Pfeiffer – her great grandmother emigrated from county Småland

Uma Thurman – her grandmother was Swedish, from county Skåne. She also speaks some Swedish.

Mark Wahlberg – his grandfather was Swedish.

Candice Bergen – her grandparents were Swedish

Swedish politics week – a summer tradition

Once a year, with exception of the last two pandemic years, there is a summer politics week in Sweden. The week is happening now, the first since 2019. It takes place in a park called Almedalen on the Baltic island of Gotland, and attracts heavy media coverage.

During the week, the leaders of the eight parliamentary parties deliver speeches – their view of Sweden’s future. This year is especially interesting as there is a General Election in September. The Economy, Crime and Punishment and Education seem to be the top issues so far.

The Almedalen politics week started when legendary Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme spoke publicly, from the back of a truck, during a summer visit to Gotland. It was at the end of the 60s and there was an audience of a few hundred people. It very quickly became a tradition.

Now Almedalen politics week attracts thousands of participants and is intended to involve the man on the street in politics and to protect the strong Swedish value of democracy and free speech. The idea is that at Almedalen politics week, we meet each other in debate. And in debate and discussion, we influence each other and our environment.

However, Almedalen Politics Week has also been heavily criticized for being elitist. The event has become a popular opportunity for businesses to meet and network with each other.

In a parallel existence, some people go to Almedalen only for this purpose and not to participate in any political activities. Social media has, in previous years, been awash with images of participants mingling, drinking rose wine, partying, dancing and taking drunken groupies.

Post Covid, we all have an opportunity to make changes. We don’t have to go back to the way things were before. The pandemic was a kind of system crash. It will be interesting to see how Almedalen politics week renews itself this year.

Sweden’s most famous Gay

Today, 2 July, marks 15 years since the death of the Swedish actress, singer and femme fatale Git Gay. Born in Karlshamn in 1921, she went on to become one of Sweden’s most popular and notorious prima donnas.

A classically trained concert pianist, Git Gay made her name as an extravagant review artist and larger-than-life tv host. She was given her stage name in 1949 by review artist Karl Gerhard, who undoubtably thought it was more showbiz than her real name Birgit Agda Carp.

By the end of her career, she had appeared in many films and shows as well as recorded numerous records, and the name Git Gay was synonymous with glamour and glitz. In fact, the word ‘kalaspingla’, roughly meaning party babe, is said to have been of her making.

After her death, in accordance with her will, a foundation was set up in her name to give cash awards to working Swedish musical and theatrical artists. The last award was given in a grand gala, Git Gay style, in 2018.